Archive for the ‘Diabetes’ Category

posted by admin on Jun 3

Heat
Hot sun and exercise may increase the rate of absorption of your insulin. Very hot weather may lead to dehydration and may increase the effects of urine loss associated with raised blood glucose. It is important to drink plenty of fluids. Beware sunburn.
Cold
Intense cold may mean that your insulin is absorbed slowly to start with and then is rapidly absorbed later when you warm up by the fire or in a warm bath. If you are out in cold, wet or windy conditions for any length of time, make sure that you are well protected against both wind and wet. The advice I gave in Chapters 9 and 10 on clothing and equipment for energetic expeditions is useful for all trips of this type.
People with diabetes who become chilled and hypoglycemic are at special risk of severe hypothermia; and from that you can die, as has been made so clear from recent publicity about the aged, who are also at risk. Studies made in Nottingham, England, showed that if people are put in a very cold room their temperature begins to fall and they start to shiver as they try to keep warm. If they are then made hypoglycemic they stop shivering and their body temperature plummets to dangerously low levels. As soon as their blood glucose is returned to normal, they start shivering again and the fall in body temperature is halted.
Always bear the following points in mind:
•   Think ahead. Take out travel insurance. Always carry your diabetes travel pack on your person. Always take twice the number of meals you think you are going to need on a journey.
•   Make sure that you are at no risk of hypoglycemia when driving or travelling in a car. Tell the driver and vehicle licensing authorities and your insurance company that you are diabetic.
•   Do not run the risk of hypoglycemia in a strange town or country.
•   Take motion sickness pills if you suspect you may need them and carry anti-emetics and anti-diarrheal pills.
•   Plan any air trips carefully. Never allow your insulin to get frozen in the baggage compartment.
•   Adjust your insulin to the way of life of the country you are visiting. Feel free to explore foreign food. If you get ill, start checking your glucose level frequently and adjust your treatment accordingly.
•   Beware extremes of heat and cold.
•   Learn from your experiences.
•   Have a good trip!
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DIABETES

posted by admin on Jun 3

People with diabetes who keep an eye on themselves and use some common sense are no more likely to get ill abroad than anyone else. However, a little forward planning is prudent. Before going away, take out travel insurance. Make sure that it is the type that will cover hospital and medical expenses in the country you are visiting and that if necessary it will cover the cost of your being flown home with a medical escort. If you are planning to spend a long time in a foreign country your doctor may be able to give you the name of a local diabetologist (the International Diabetes Federation has members in virtually every country in the world).
It may be useful to carry with you a letter summarizing your medical condition and medication. If you need medical help, try to find a doctor who speaks your language and make certain that he knows that you are diabetic and that you need insulin or tablets (hang on to your personal supply in case the doctor or hospital do not have that brand, and ask what dose to take). If you get very ill in a remote part of the world it may be better to be flown home, assuming that the pressure changes of air travel are not hazardous for your condition.
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DIABETES